God’s Will Over World’s Praise

I love John 3:30, which reads (ESV), “He must increase, but I must decrease.” I’ve spoken many times about how the English translations, for some reason, all fail to notice that “decrease” is passive, while “increase” is active voice. This means He increases himself, but I do not decrease myself—that is his action as well. The Lord’s increase of himself in my life, necessitates a decrease of my own value and importance, even in my own life. When his interests come to the fore in my life, my own interests are pushed to the rear. However, this is not what this blog post is about. That is a discussion I’ve had before and will have again another day.

Today, I want to consider the similarity between John 3:30 and Isaiah 2:11. In that passage, God says (ESV), “The haughty looks of man shall be brought low, and the lofty pride of men shall be humbled, and the Lord alone will be exalted in that day.”

When John the Baptizer speaks in chapter three and verse thirty of the gospel of John, he is responding to those who sought to defend him. They believed John was being disrespected by Jesus, whom John had baptized. Jesus was now drawing more people after himself for baptism. Remember this was a day where the Patron Client relationship ran through all areas of human interaction. It was natural for them to see the obligation of Jesus to defer to John, who had after all blessed him. In their world view Jesus was usurping John’s place and was being disrespectful. Of course, we know this was not the case, because this was exactly what God had created John for. This was John’s telos, his purpose, to baptize Jesus, give testimony about him and then to fade into the background.

John’s friends wanted him to demand his rights. They wanted John to be honored above one who had received ministry from him. They believed they had his interests in mind, but they did not understand one important thing—the divinity of Jesus. As Lord, Jesus deserved all honor and praise. Jesus as redeemer deserved far more honor than one who served as a sign pointing to that redeemer. As creator incarnate, Jesus deserved the awe and respect of his creation. Any man insisting on being honored above Jesus was, at best, laughable.

What John’s friends failed to realize was that they were encouraging John to be the exact sort of person rebuked in Isaiah 2:11. They wanted John to raise himself up and insist on his rights; insist on his honor. In their effort to protect and honor their friend, they failed to realize they were encouraging him to rebel against the very purpose for which God had created him.

We too easily get the idea that we deserve certain things; certain treatment; certain returns. However, we have to remember that, as subjects of the King of Heaven and Earth, we receive what he intends for us. Our lives are determined and directed by God’s interests, not our own.

If his will for us appears to the world as success, then we must remember it is his blessing that brought it. If his will for us appears to the world as failure, then we must find joy in knowing we are living his will.

What matters is not worldly success, wealth or privilege. What matters is knowing we are right where God wants us; knowing we are doing what God has called us to do; knowing we are living the life God has laid out for us. Seek alignment with the Lord’s will rather than exaltation in the world’s eyes.

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Ken Cluck
Senior Pastor at Resurgent
Ken has served in various cultures and settings, including two Native American reservations, rural communities, Korean churches, and has worked with Asian refugees living in the US.

Ken's passions are Theology, Philosophy (especially Philosophy of Religion, Ethics and Logic), History and Politics.

Ken has been married to his wife, Yong, since 1987. She is the center of his world and the greatest joy of his life.