Tag Archives: humility

Eager For Unity

Ephesians 4:1-7 begins with a command. Paul urges the reader (including us today) to walk in a manner worthy of the calling to which they (including us) have been called. We’ve all heard this command preached on more than one occasion. It’s a favorite, especially in holiness circles. We are commanded to walk (to live our lives) in a manner (a way) worthy (equal to, fitting to) the calling to which we have been called. Paul goes on to define this worthy walk.

This walk, worthy of the calling, is defined by Paul with three nouns and two participial phrases. He describes it as a walk (way of life) marked by humility, gentleness and patience. These are the three nouns. Interestingly, if one’s walk is marked by these nouns, it would be safe to assume that walk would demonstrate the details given in the following participial phrases. These phrases tell us to “bear with one another in love” and to be “eager to maintain the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace.” It seems if one is humble, gentle and patient, there is no need to include these last two. However, Paul is dealing with something the church has dealt with throughout her history—disunity. We easily find excuses to divide. Paul is adding some detail to give greater emphasis to the unifying side of the worthy walk.

I want to zone in on this last part for this blog post. Paul includes in a worthy walk being “eager to maintain the unity of the Spirit.” Some translations lose something here. The NIV, for example, translates this as “make every effort to keep the unity of the Spirit.” But this merely means doing everything involved in keeping the peace. It misses the element of drive, push or haste. Let’s say I have a project to accomplish. I can expend every effort to accomplish the project and do so simply out of a sense of obligation. I would do everything needed to accomplish the project, but not really care if it works or fails—“It failed, but I did my part.” I can also not care how long the project takes, because there is a lack of haste or passion in my actions. In the same way, the NIV translation of this make it sound like Paul is saying to do what is needed or appropriate to maintain unity, without any reference to our drive, passion or zeal. It seems to reduce it to nothing but an action commanded. But the passage is much more powerful than this. The HCSB translates this as “diligently keeping the unity of the Spirit.” This, at least, gives some of the emphasis Paul places upon the command.

Paul is not just telling us to work at being united. Paul is not just including such unity as part of our walk. He is telling us to strive for, to be eager for, to diligently desire and work to maintain that unity. Unity of the body to which we are called (the Church Universal and the local expression of the church, where he has placed us). We should desire unity more than our own way. We should eagerly seek to keep the church together—even if it means giving up our own way and our own desires. That , after all, is part of the humility which he earlier used to describe the worthy life. We should desire unity even if it means dealing with our imperfect fellow Christians—even when it hurts. That, after all, is part of the patience which he earlier used to describe the worthy life. We should desire and work toward unity even when it would be far easier to attack and drive out those we find difficulty. That, after all, is part of the gentleness which he earlier used to describe the worthy life.

Paul commands us (God commands us through Paul) to bear one another’s burdens and eagerly strive to keep the church together as a united whole. We are not to drive those out or separate ourselves from our fellow believers. We are to strive to keep the church together. The only reasons to ever drive one out of the church is heresy (2 John 1:10) or discipline (1 Corinthians 5:5). Even that is meant to bring them back to repentance and back to the fold as fully restored members (2 Corinthians 2:6-7).

Be eager to maintain the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace. This command (σπουδάζοντες) tells us to do this quickly, with haste, without waiting. When some action or behavior disrupts our unity, or breaches the bond of peace, we are commanded to quickly (eagerly, with haste) strive for restoration. This is a direct command to each of us—me, you and everyone else called to salvation by Christ.


God’s Will Over World’s Praise

I love John 3:30, which reads (ESV), “He must increase, but I must decrease.” I’ve spoken many times about how the English translations, for some reason, all fail to notice that “decrease” is passive, while “increase” is active voice. This means He increases himself, but I do not decrease myself—that is his action as well. The Lord’s increase of himself in my life, necessitates a decrease of my own value and importance, even in my own life. When his interests come to the fore in my life, my own interests are pushed to the rear. However, this is not what this blog post is about. That is a discussion I’ve had before and will have again another day.

Today, I want to consider the similarity between John 3:30 and Isaiah 2:11. In that passage, God says (ESV), “The haughty looks of man shall be brought low, and the lofty pride of men shall be humbled, and the Lord alone will be exalted in that day.”

When John the Baptizer speaks in chapter three and verse thirty of the gospel of John, he is responding to those who sought to defend him. They believed John was being disrespected by Jesus, whom John had baptized. Jesus was now drawing more people after himself for baptism. Remember this was a day where the Patron Client relationship ran through all areas of human interaction. It was natural for them to see the obligation of Jesus to defer to John, who had after all blessed him. In their world view Jesus was usurping John’s place and was being disrespectful. Of course, we know this was not the case, because this was exactly what God had created John for. This was John’s telos, his purpose, to baptize Jesus, give testimony about him and then to fade into the background.

John’s friends wanted him to demand his rights. They wanted John to be honored above one who had received ministry from him. They believed they had his interests in mind, but they did not understand one important thing—the divinity of Jesus. As Lord, Jesus deserved all honor and praise. Jesus as redeemer deserved far more honor than one who served as a sign pointing to that redeemer. As creator incarnate, Jesus deserved the awe and respect of his creation. Any man insisting on being honored above Jesus was, at best, laughable.

What John’s friends failed to realize was that they were encouraging John to be the exact sort of person rebuked in Isaiah 2:11. They wanted John to raise himself up and insist on his rights; insist on his honor. In their effort to protect and honor their friend, they failed to realize they were encouraging him to rebel against the very purpose for which God had created him.

We too easily get the idea that we deserve certain things; certain treatment; certain returns. However, we have to remember that, as subjects of the King of Heaven and Earth, we receive what he intends for us. Our lives are determined and directed by God’s interests, not our own.

If his will for us appears to the world as success, then we must remember it is his blessing that brought it. If his will for us appears to the world as failure, then we must find joy in knowing we are living his will.

What matters is not worldly success, wealth or privilege. What matters is knowing we are right where God wants us; knowing we are doing what God has called us to do; knowing we are living the life God has laid out for us. Seek alignment with the Lord’s will rather than exaltation in the world’s eyes.